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In which Draco and Harry dress a little too quickly after a meeting

(via iamafantasticbeast)

Source: scaredpotter
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coolestpriest:

I’m glad this nerd got in an accident

(via kingmycroftholmes)

Source: memewhore
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dhhyey:

George’s son calls from Hogwarts on the first day of school, terrified, and keeps asking if George is ok.
George reassures him that everything is alright, but asks why he was asking that. George’s son explains that he thought his father had died, because he could have sworn that he had seen a ghost who looked just like him joking around with the older students…

(via iamafantasticbeast)

Source: dhhyey
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shaestel:

sallybethdraperss:

Actually, there’s a lot more feminists can do when it comes to Tudor historiography:

  1. Smash the “long-suffering legal wife” trope. Katharine of Aragon was a WARRIOR. Emphasize that.
  2. Focus less on Anne Boleyn as a victim but what Anne did that made her a victim (challenging social norms by voicing her opinions in sociopolitical matters. Yes, the heir thing was a factor—-but so was the Queen Esther thing.)
  3. Pay more attention to Jane Seymour. As in WAY more attention. She was so subtle and everything she did is still so easy to miss, almost five hundred years later.
  4. Do not underestimate Anne of Cleves. Look beyond her looks.
  5. Reconsider EVERYTHING that is known about Katherine Howard. I’m not exaggerating here — EVERY. LITTLE. THING. about her.
  6. Catherine Parr was the first woman to publish a book in her own name in the history of England. Is this general knowledge? No. Is Catherine Parr a feminist figure? Sadly, no. She should be.

Look, Anne Boleyn was a remarkable woman. I have fierce respect for her, and her death was an unjust tragedy. I adore and admire her. I will never not think that of her. But I am not in the minority in thinking that of Anne Boleyn. Many, many people hold the same views, and they have done so since her own time. She’s been defended fiercely since Elizabeth I’s reign.

That is not to say that she has never been criticised, never been condemned or vilified by historians, but if we look at the ratio of positive:negative interpretations of her, over the centuries, then we can be assured that Anne Boleyn has been stalwartly defended by history.

The same cannot be said for her female peers: the other ladies of her era are either ignored, and forgotten, or vilified and punished by historians. Again, that is not to say that they have not received defence over the centuries but if we consider the same ratio of positive:negative interpretations that we first applied to Anne Boleyn, then it should be undeniable that the rest of the ladies of Anne’s era (for the most part, this of course excludes Elizabeth I, who goes hand in hand with her mother in history) have not enjoyed the same level of defence. 

Why should one woman be defended and acknowledged over the rest? That is not what feminism is. If you want your historiography to count, as a feminist historian, reconsider everything about every female history figure. Celebrate them all. Don’t prioritise one over the other as being more important. You won’t manage to study and write about every woman who ever existed ever, but if you’re going to be passionate about Anne, then be passionate about her as a woman who existed in a period of history wherein many other women worthy of note also existed. Do not be passionate about her above others, at the detriment of others. Do not claim that she is the most important, that she is the pinnacle of a feminist historian’s career. The other historical women are more than that. Anne is more than that. 

(via queenrhaenyra)

Source: real-tudor-confessions
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Chris Evans + Hands

(via queenrhaenyra)

Source: colindonoghue
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